Santa Fe Farmers Market | Slow Money Movement

Santa Fe Farmer’s Market

“SLOW MONEY” movement

Back in August of 2009 I was visiting Santa Fe, New Mexico with a friend and we stopped by the new Farmer’s Market at the old Railyard.  They have a special train that comes up from Albequerque every Saturday.

The Santa Fe farmer’s market is one of the top 10 farmer’s markets in the US.  It was quite impressive to visit.  Plenty of variety of foods, fruits, veggies, herbs, crafts, bakery goods.

SFfarmerThere’s also an adjoining Artist’s Market next to the park – hey, this is Santa Fe – home of more artists per capita than any place I’ve been – and I should add, not just run of the mill art or south western art but stuff that comes from California to New York, Europe, Asia and beyond.

Inside one of the buildings I noticed these posters on the wall talking about this Slow Money concept.  You can click on the gallery pictures to read the gist of it.  I also wrote out the main parts below.

Slow Money . . . From the Ground Up

Santa Fe Farmers Market in the Railyard – sept 9-11, 2009

Since late 2008, thousands of Americans in dozens of cities and towns have participated in the launch of the slow money movement. Is it the beginning of the nurture capital industry? A new vision of seed capital?

Join thought leaders, entrepreneurs, investors,donors, farmers and activists for Slow Money’s inaugural national gathering, bringing together people from across the country, and also featuring a focus on New Mexico’s regional food system.

Let’s fix America’s economy ‘from the ground up’ . . . starting with local food.

Slow Money Principles

  1. We must bring money back down to earth.
  2. There is such a thing as money that is too fast, companies that are too big, finance that is too complex. Therefore, we must slow our money down – not all of it, of course, but enough to matter.
  3. The 20th Century economy was an economy of Buy Low / Sell High and Wealth Now / Philanthropy Later — what one venture capitalist called “the largest legal accumulation of wealth in history.”  The 21st Century economy will usher in the era of nurture capital, built around principles of carrying capacity, care of the commons, sense of place and non-violence.
  4. We must learn to invest as if food, farms, and fertility mattered. We must steer major new sources of capital to small food enterprises.
  5. Let us celebrate the new generation of entrepreneurs, consumers and investors who are showing the way from Making A Killing to Making a Living.
  6. Paul Newman said, “I just happen to think that in life we need to be a little like the farmer who puts back into the soil what he takes out.” Recognizing the wisdom of these words, let us begin rebuilding our economy from the ground up, asking:
  • What would the world be like if we invested 50% of our assets within 50 miles of where we live?
  • What if there were a new generation of companies tha gave away 50% of their profits?
  • What if there were 50% more organic matter in our soil 50 years from now?

LEARN MORE @ http://www.SlowMoneyAlliance.org

New Powerstick™ Makes Going Mobile Easier

powerstick“This device has been given the nod as the one essential gadget destined to make everyone’s life easier. With upwards of 100,000 MP3 players forecast to be sold in New Zealand for this Christmas period alone, not to mention the fact that many of us now have multiple cellphones, PDAs, iPhone and/or a BlackBerry, consumers are crying out for a way to recharge all their devices in one simple way.

“We have the answer,” says Binns. The Powerstick™ is designed and manufactured in Canada by Ecosol, an engineering-led company with a remit to develop and manufacture sustainable products. With the Powerstick™ that sustainability is achieved in many ways:

  • Consumers now only need one small product to charge virtually all their portable devices
  • The Powerstick™ is a portable rechargeable device that comes with a one-year warranty
  • Chargeable from a laptop, desktop or any device with a USB port (including cars and aircraft)
  • Once charged the Powerstick™ Polymer Lithium battery retains more than 90% of energy so it can be left unused but charged for up to 6 months
  • Having topped up the Powerstick™  will go into sleep mode and will stop drawing down energy unlike normal wall chargers.
  • The LCD display lets the user know when they need a top up, no guessing required and no unnecessary drawdowns

“My arsenal of digital devices is now completely taken care of,” says Binns. “The  Powerstick™ comes with 9 different device connectors including iPod, Nokia, Motorola, Mini-USB, LD, and Samsung. You can charge so many things with one stick and it’s also surge protected, so it can’t harm your precious work or play tools. ”

“It’s the essential gadget for the traveller (business or leisure), the student, the music lover and the workplace, pretty much anyone with a portable device. Most of us find it a challenge to run an iPhone all day without charging. With the  Powerstick™ you can charge up and keep talking, giving you greater peace of mind,” assures Binns.

Powerstick™  is available in New Zealand initially through Noel Leeming and online at powerstick.co.nz. With a RRP of $79, it’s an ideal Christmas gift, let alone a useful tool for having the cell, iPod and PDA charged in the beach-bag over summer. And at home users will no longer have to invest in a network of powerboards for their usual electric spaghetti. For more information and for compatibility (virtually all mobile devices are covered). Overseas, check out www.powerstick.co.nz or call Richard Binns on 021 913 984.

Full Article Source

UPDATE – Powerstick is available in US for $49.99

go to POWERSTICK.COM

This is a must have piece of tech in my book.  Especially for the on the go world traveller or even just the on – the – go person who has a lot of energy hungry gadgets.  Heck, for $50, I think I’ll pick up a few.

Each powerstick comes with 9 adaptors but one shortcoming I can see right away is this won’t help me with my 2 AA powered digital camera that loves to run out of juice before the party is over.  Maybe I just need a new camera, but I don’t like to be wasteful as the old one ain’t broke yet.

Blog Pee | Febuary 2, 2010

Blog Pee | Febuary 2, 2010

Groundhog Day

that was a funny movie….

yes, it’s blog pee time again, even though we just went… and I’m not sure if it’s still groundhog day or not… each tomorrow seems the same as yesterday’s spilt milk.

COFFEE – TEA – SODA POP – PEE

green-tea-shadedThe caffeine found in tea leaves is not the same as the caffeine in coffee beans.

For one, tea is much lower in general, rich in anti-oxidants and balanced verses the highs and lows caused by coffee.

Coffee caffeine perpetuates the physiological symptoms as seen in anxiety and stress – racing heartbeat, insomnia, sweating, nervousness, agitation and palpations.  This is all associated with one’s Sympathetic Nervous System or the fight or flight instinct.

Tea on the other hand stimulates the Parasympathetic Nervous System, or the “rest and digest” response.

So the message is, drink coffee and freak out. Drink tea and feel relaxed, happy and healthy. It encourages a clear mind, improves concentration and helps digest food properly.

****808****

Things that were better when my parents were growing up.

No microwaves.

The ground soil that we grow our food in wasn’t so depleted.

GMO foods didn’t exist.

Fast food was a rarity.

****808****

Feel sorry for the Chinese youth…. ignorance may seem blissful but to me they seem like brainwashed little sheeple who don’t know or apparently care about freedom.  What they don’t know does hurt them. They don’t even know they’re being subjected to excessive censorship.

They think they have choices, but like cable tv, there’s 57 channels of crap.  sure there’s different flavors to ‘choose’ from, but it’s all crap in the end.

Clueless Ignorant Chinese

****808****

upon watching slobama’s 2010 SofU address… what comes to mind is this:

joining dar cast of idiots, morons & baffoons >> joe biden dar bobblehead und nancy palosi clap happy jack in dar box clown

****808****

I love reading comments on youtube – it confirms that one can be an ignorant douchebag but still be just smart enough to use a computer and surf the internet.

****808****

A comeback for when someone calls you crazy:

_

Crazy?
There are many who will dub me a ‘nut’ for what
I have written and spoken.

My reply is this:
Today’s mighty oak is just
yesterday’s nut that held its ground.


A New Way Of Farming To Save Detroit?

urban_agricultureThis is possibly not as crazy as it sounds. Granted, the notion of devoting valuable city land to agriculture would be unfathomable in New York, London, or Tokyo. But Detroit is a special case. The city that was once the fourth largest in the country and served as a symbol of America’s industrial might has lately assumed a new role: North American poster child for the global phenomenon of shrinking postindustrial cities.

Nearly 2 million people used to live in Detroit. Fewer than 900,000 remain. Even if, unlikely as it seems, the auto industry were to rebound dramatically and the U.S. economy were to come roaring back tomorrow, no one — not even the proudest civic boosters — imagines that the worst is over. “Detroit will probably be a city of 700,000 people when it’s all said and done,” says Doug Rothwell, CEO of Business Leaders for Michigan. “The big challenge is, What do you do with a population of 700,000 in a geography that can accommodate three times that much?”

Whatever the answer is, whenever it comes, it won’t be predicated on a return to past glory. “We have to be realistic,” says George Jackson, CEO of the Detroit Economic Growth Corp. (DEGC). “This is not about trying to re-create something. We’re not a world-class city.”

If not world class, then what? A regional financial center? That’s already Chicago, and to a lesser extent Minneapolis. A biotech hub? Boston and San Diego are way out in front. Some think Detroit has a future in TV and movies, but Hollywood is skeptical. (“Best incentives in the country,” one producer says. “Worst crew.”) How about high tech and green manufacturing? Possibly, given the engineering and manufacturing talent that remains.

But still there’s the problem of what to do with the city’s enormous amount of abandoned land, conservatively estimated at 40 square miles in a sprawling metropolis whose 139-square-mile footprint is easily bigger than San Francisco, Boston, and Manhattan combined. If you let it revert to nature, you abandon all hope of productive use. If you turn it over to parks and recreation, you add costs to an overburdened city government that can’t afford to teach its children, police its streets, or maintain the infrastructure it already has.

Faced with those facts, a growing number of policymakers and urban planners have begun to endorse farming as a solution. Former HUD secretary Henry Cisneros, now chairman of CityView, a private equity firm that invests in urban development, is familiar with Detroit’s land problem. He says he’s in favor of “other uses that engage human beings in their maintenance, such as urban agriculture.” After studying the city’s options at the request of civic leaders, the American Institute of Architects came to this conclusion in a recent report: “Detroit is particularly well suited to become a pioneer in urban agriculture at a commercial scale.”

And I would add, this is a great opportunity to explore the potential of vertical hydroponic farming models – even though they point out that there is plenty of land – horizontally speaking.  But that shouldn’t be a reason to ignore future tech.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE