Mockingbird Night Serenade March 2015

Mockingbird Night Serenade March 2015

 

Mockingbird Singing at Night March 5th, 2015. Clearwater Florida.

This mockingbird was singing for hours through the night and several nights afterward. He was in the middle of the parking lot in some palm trees. Because of the surrounding highrise condos, there was a nice echo going on along with the crickets serenading in the background. Took several samples from about 10:00pm till about 11:30pm on March 5th. Had to edit out cars and people noises. Edited it all in REASON 8. Ended up with about 35 minutes of audio here.

Have a separate audio of songs on first day of spring, march 21, 2015, but those have a lot of traffic sound from construction going on in Clearwater on US19 and didn’t fit with the this more quiet and peaceful night. Sort of an interesting dichotomy of pleasant and irritating sounds. If I could, I’d separate them into left and right channels and make it into some sort of Dr Evil horrible binaural beat brainwashing bit.

This is another ‘Audio Catnip’ soundscape that people and other animals like too. I plan on combining the daytime one together as 2 tracks running consecutively for an hour or so of music or should I say sound.

Birds Sing For The Fun Of It

Birds, Like Humans, Sing Just Because They Can

I read about this in a Natural Awakenings magazine [Sept 2010]

Gives new meaning to the term “Bird Brained.”

It has been determined that birds not only sing to communicate daily needs, but many engage in sound play, most often when they’re alone, but sometimes also when people are around.

Some bird species continually improvise and embellish their singing with new elements, phrasing and sequences.  For example, nightingales and canaries are avian virtuosos, reinventing their song repertoire each year. The brown thrasher is said to have around 2000 song types Рa record. Nightingales organize their compositions according to rules of construction similar to the way humans use syntax [the arrangement of words and phrases]. Nightingales also create distinctive phrases that identify them as individuals.

Recordings or Australian magpies reveal how the bird’s voice ¬†covers four octaves, varies its phrasing between staccato and legato, and embellishes sequences with vibrato, trills or deep overtones. More, it will complete a song with a signature phrase, much like an artist initials a finished painting.